Permanent Residence (Green Card) Through Marriage

Marriage to a citizen or permanent resident (green card holder) of the U.S. is one of the most common ways for foreign-born individuals to acquire permanent resident status in the United States. It is important to remember, however, that marriage does not automatically convert someone to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and anyone seeking permanent residence must be admissible. In some situations, waivers may be attainable for certain kinds of inadmissibility.

To learn more about permanent residence through marriage, or for help removing conditions of your two-year green card, contact us for a consultation today.

Immigration Through Family

Citizens and permanent residents of the United States are eligible to petition for certain members of their families, enabling those family members to become permanent residents in the United States, too. Depending on the family relationship and country of birth of the beneficiary, some cases take longer than others to be processed.

Immigration through family can be complicated, but we can help you and your family members through every step of the process whether you will be processing abroad through a U.S. embassy or consulate, or adjusting status inside the United States. Don’t wait, changes in the age of the beneficiary or derivative beneficiary can affect processing times dramatically. Schedule a consultation to find the best options for your family.

Fiancé(e) Visas

If the love of your life is living abroad, contact us to discuss filing a fiancé(e) petition. Fiancé(e) visas are issued at consulates and embassies abroad. Once your fiancé(e) enters the United States, you must get married within ninety days.

We can help you through every step of the process to bring your fiancé(e) to the United States. Contact us to schedule a consultation.

Same-sex Couples

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services now recognizes legal same-sex marriages for purposes of petitioning a foreign-born spouse for permanent resident status, or to obtain other immigration benefits. Contact us to help!

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Citizenship for Service Members and Military Families

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Citizenship for Service Members and Military Families

If you are serving in the U.S. Armed Forces and are not yet a U.S. citizen, you may benefit from expedited eligibility for citizenship.

Benefits to military family members are available on a case-by-case basis and may include eligibility for permanent residence (green card), deferred action, or relief from deportation.

If you are an active-duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, a veteran, or an enlistee with a family member who is undocumented, has over-stayed his or her visa, or is facing deportation, please contact our office to schedule a consultation.

Removal of Conditions

If you obtain legal residence through a marriage to a U.S. citizen and your case is approved before your second wedding anniversary, your residency will be conditional. Conditional residency is granted for two years. Before you can be granted permanent residency, you will be required to prove that the marriage was entered into legitimately, and not solely for immigration purposes. If you are still married to your petitioning spouse, you and your spouse will jointly petition to remove the conditions of your residency 90 days before the expiration of your conditional residency. Your joint petition must be supported by evidence that you are continuing to live together in a marital relationship. You and your spouse may or may not be scheduled for an interview with a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services officer. If you and your spouse are no longer married, it may still be possible to remove the conditions of your residency by applying for a waiver of the joint-filing requirement. Waivers are available in certain cases where the marriage was entered into good faith but ended through divorce, in certain cases involving domestic violence or abuse, or where removal of the conditional resident would cause an extreme hardship. Contact Us to discuss the specifics of your case.

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Renew your Green Card

Are you already a permanent resident? Be sure to keep your resident alien card (green card) current. If your green card expires in the next six months or has been lost or stolen, contact us to right away to request a renewal or replacement green card.

 Did you know that permanent residents (green card holders) are required to notify U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services within 10 days of changing their address? It’s the law! Contact us for help updating your address.

Victims of Crime‏

Some crime victims who assisted in the investigation or prosecution of a crime may be eligible for a special type of visa, called a U visa. U visas are typically granted for four years, and the recipient is generally eligible to apply for permanent residency (green card) after three years in U visa status.

If you are the victim of a serious crime, contact our office to discuss your eligibility for a U visa.

VAWA

If you were subjected to serious physical or mental abuse by a family member who is or was a U.S. citizen or permanent resident (green card holder), you may be eligible for an immigration benefit known as VAWA.

Schedule a consultation to learn more.